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Lesson 14: Absolute References with the F4 Key

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Absolute references with the F4 key

If you're typing a formula, you may sometimes want a cell reference to stay locked on a specific cell or cell range even if the formula is copied. To do this, you'll need to change the cell reference to an absolute reference by adding dollar signs before the row and column (for example, $D$2).

Although you can type the dollar signs manually, the F4 key on your keyboard allows you to add both dollar signs with a single keystroke. If you create formulas frequently, this shortcut can save you a lot of time.

Watch the video below to learn how to use the F4 shortcut.

On some keyboards, the F4 key controls the computer's volume or screen brightness by default. In that case, you may have to hold down the Fn (Function) key before pressing F4.

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